Free Subtraction Worksheet

When teaching skills such as addition and subtraction, many websites provide free resources to help students practice their math skills. Education.com is a website I use when looking for homework and classwork.

One of the best features about education.com is that you can build your own custom worksheet.  This is a great feature for teachers who want to modify the number of problems or type of problems they are giving their students.

If you do not want a custom built sheet, Education.com provides many choices for teachers to choose from. Challenge your mathematicians with this FREE fun school-themed subtraction worksheet below.

Free Subtraction Worksheet from Education.com

Answers To Free Subtraction Worksheet from Education.com

Here is a subtraction poem I use in my classroom to help students remember the steps to subtraction.

math charts, resources, anchor posters

Enjoy more math worksheets from Education.com.

Find the Area: Guest Blog Post from education.com

Introduce the concept of area to your third grader with this fun card game. You’ll show your child how to determine the area of any object and help him begin thinking in terms of units as you create shapes out of playing cards. Count the cards you use or try applying multiplication to find the total area. Once you’ve got the hang of the game, assign different values to the cards!

What You Need:

  • Deck of cards
  • Several players

What You Do:

  1. Decide on the unit value of the cards. If you decide on the number 2, each card will amount to two units and players will have to keep this value in mind when calculating the area of the figure you’re building.
  2. Have the players take turns placing one card at a time face down on a flat surface. Every card placed down should touch the side of another card. Cards should not overlap.
  3. Every so often, interrupt the game and have one of the players calculate the area of the figure.

education.com

Helpful Tip: You may want to guide the players to build rectangles as they’ll make it easier to calculate the area. Stop the game at intervals when rectangles have been completed. Then, introduce the formula for finding the area of a rectangle: length x width= area.

Play this game multiple times and assign the cards several different values in order to get as much practice as possible.

TeacherTalk4all would like to thank education.com for being a guest blogger on our site and for sharing this activity with us. We think this game is engaging and a great way to introduce area at home or in the classroom. We are a supporter of education.com and thank them for all their dedication to helping teachers and students.

 

Thinking Blocks-Visuals for Solving Math Word Problems

When teaching children how to solve word problems, many teachers model how to solve the problem on the board with a diagram and think-aloud (going through each step/thought process). A great digital tool to use is a site called Thinking Blocks. It allows teachers to model how to draw/label a diagram for addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. As the website states, word problems are easier to solve when you build a model first.

math world problems, visual support, math manipulatives

Regrouping: Adding and Subtracting Posters

In our math centers, we have been focusing on adding and subtracting two and three digit numbers. To help my kids remember the steps, they reference these posters at our centers.

Adding:

anchor posters, chart

 

Subtracting:

math charts, resources, anchor posters

Since students need different levels of support, counters, number lines, and pictures are used to help students understand the concept. In particular, I found that using a 0-20 number line was very helpful for my students who were having a hard time. The other number lines featured can be useful if you teach students to estimate their answer.

manipulatives, regrouping

 

Place Value Centers

What is Place Value:

To teach children the numerical value of a digit in a number, students need visuals, models, and manipulatives to help them understand why the placement of numbers matter.

Visual and Kinesthetic Learning Tips:

To introduce the concept, I start with tens and ones to help my students understand that numbers can be built with place value blocks. I teach them that ten ones (in yellow) equal one ten rod (in green). Students practice creating numbers with the ones, and then the tens and ones.

visual learning,

The board is also extremely helpful when helping students understand how many tens and ones are in a number. Students who are experiencing difficulty could build the number on the board and then easily transfer their results on the paper to help them understand the concept.

tips for teaching, visual learning

Another feature I love about this board is how it is color coded. This becomes useful when I write numbers since I can stay with the original color scheme when writing a number. Although yellow can be hard to read, orange can be used as a substitute if students are experiencing difficulty reading in that color.  Once I write the numbers, I then ask students to tell me the value of each number. This introduction to place value begins at the main teacher table (in my classroom, we have three to four rotating centers throughout our math period).

Greater Than/Less Than: Comparing Numbers

At station two, students practice comparing the value of each digit by comparing numbers. Since some students confuse the greater/than less sign, additional visuals of a gator can help students remember the meaning of the sign (the gator eats the largest number). At this station, students do a variety of activities to practice. One of my favorite includes a ‘roll and make’ game that has students roll the number, make the number, expand, and then compare the number. A free sample of the game is here.

place value, comparing, lesson ideas, visuals

Read and Write

At station 3, students practice reading and writing numbers. Students are taught to not say “and” when reading numbers. They can practice this over and over again with new numbers written by other students at the table. A great resource I love are the write and wipe boards featured below. This is a highly recommended resource when teaching place value!

elementary math tips visuals

math tips, read and write

Rounding Using A Number Line

Rounding is a difficult concept to master for students who do not have strong number sense. In our classroom, we use wipe-off numbers lines for students who have a difficult time visualizing how a number fits within a framework of different numbers. The number lines that skip-count by 10s and 100s are used when my students are rounding to the 10s or 100s.The last number line, featured blank, is used for students who want to make their own number line to help them round.

elementary tips, visuals, manipulative img_4006

Teaching Units of Measurement

Teaching units of measurement to elementary school children can be a challenge without using exciting visuals and videos that can help students remember the difference between very similar words. Here is a list of tools I have used in my classroom to either introduce, repeat, or reteach the units of measurement.

Video Resources:

  1. Units of Length

2.Units of Capacity:

3. Units of Metric

4. Converting Units of Metrics: http://study.com/academy/lesson/how-to-convert-units-in-the-metric-system.html#lesson

5. Units of Metric

 

 

Helpful Free Math Review Websites

Reviewing for math can be a drag for some students, but with the use of new technology and software, students can practice skills using the following websites.

Our school uses EnVision (a great math program!). Many resources are available online, but here are some additional sites students can use to reinforce skills previously taught in class.

1. Fractions (Topic 11) Review:

2. Topic 12 (adding and subtracting fractions): games 2-8 will be a great review:

4. To review division, please visit:

5. To review multiplication, an engaging site is:

Minecraft Math Arrays

Many teachers aim to find real world application and connections to topics covered in school. When teaching math to my group of fourth graders, I came across this YouTube video that used Minecraft to build arrays. My students were so excited and went home to create videos of them building arrays using the computer game. This was definitely a highlight for my class.

Mystery Number Riddles

Mystery Number Jeopardy

During a math review game, I recently had a mystery number jeopardy section. The students loved the challenge and worked as a team to find the answer. I displayed each riddle and gave the students 30 seconds to complete the challenge. This was currently for a third grade class I was teaching. Feel free to use the riddles below.

100:

  •  “I am a two digit number”
  •  “I only have even digits.”
  •  “My sum is 10.”
  •  “The digit in the ten’s place is six more than the digit in the one’s place.”
  • What is the mystery number?
  • Answer 82

200:

  • I am a two digit number.
  • I am an odd number.
  •  The sum of my digits is 8.
  • Both the digits are odd.
  • What is the mystery number?
  • Answer: 71

300:

  • I am a three-digit number.
  • Two of my digits are odd and one is even.
  • 10-8=the digit in the one’s place
  • The digit in the tens place is one more than the unit in the ones place
  • The sum of all the three digits is 10.
  • Answer: 532

400:

  • I am a three-digit number.
  • Two of my digits are odd and one digit is even
  • The digit in the ones place and tens place combined is 9.
  • The sum of the three digits is 18.
  • Answer: 927

500:

  • I am a three-digit number.
  • All my digits are even
  • The digit in the ones place is half of the digit in the tens place
  • The digit in the tens place is doubled than the digit in the ones place
  • The digits in the hundreds place is doubled than the digit in the tens place
  • The sum of all the digits is 14
  • Answer: 842